Blog

How to choose the BEST title for your journal article

Choosing a journal article title is a very important part of the scientific process because it may influence the impact of your work and the number of readers that it will attract. Here’s a list of my top tips for picking the most effective journal article title. DO DRAFT A NUMBER OF DIFFERENT TITLE IDEAS AS YOU WRITE YOUR ARTICLE It’s a great idea to generate a number of different titles for your article as you write it. Start with a draft title in the beginning and then focus on writing the rest of the paper. When you have new ideas, go back and add them in. This is great for collaborative work as other authors can make title suggestions as article drafts circulate. Once you are ready with the…

Read more
How to choose the BEST title for your journal article
Turn your scientific journal article into a blogpost with these easy steps

Turn your scientific journal article into a blogpost with these easy steps

Academia is very different than it was 20 years ago. In the digital world, academic authors now get multiple chances to create and put out their own messages. So why not turn your article into a blog post that might engage more readers or that media outlets might even pick up? It’s easy to do following these steps: STEP 1: Cut down the Introduction section In the blog context, you do not need to provide a comprehensively referenced literature review in your Introduction. Just write a short summary in 3 or 4 lines that details why the research is interesting and important.Don’t be afraid to express yourself with easier words so people understand what it’s about.Your task here is to evoke interest, and give readers a good narrative steer that attracts…

Read more

The Lancet Planetary Health: Our new study finds medical education does not equip students to provide high quality nutritional care

Why is this study important? Globally, 11 million deaths annually are attributable to poor diet, making it the leading risk factor for death across the world [1]. Accordingly, many countries recommend that doctors apply nutrition knowledge in practice to support patients to manage lifestyle-related chronic disease and other diet-related conditions. A well recognised evidenced-practice gap exists between the nutrition knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed for nutrition care and the nutrition education provided to medical students. What did the study investigate? Our systematic review aimed to critically synthesise literature on nutrition education provided to medical students. It identified new insights into how medical nutrition education can be enhanced to ultimately improve dietary behaviours of individuals and populations worldwide. The review looked at studies assessing recently graduated (ie, ≤4 years) or current…

Read more
The Lancet Planetary Health: Our new study finds medical education does not equip students to provide high quality nutritional care
Forget “writer’s block”, I’ve got “editor’s block” – help!

Forget “writer’s block”, I’ve got “editor’s block” – help!

In academia, we often talk about “writer’s block”. This is when you find it difficult to figure out what you want to say to your audience. Something that is not as commonly discussed is “editor’s block”. This can be just as frustrating. It happens when you have finished the first draft of a paper and you cannot figure out how to edit it so it can reach its fullest potential. One editing strategy that I find useful when I get “editor’s block” is to write out a –reverse outline. Let’s look at this in more detail. What is a reverse outline? A reverse outline is what happens when you take away all of the supporting writing and are left with each paragraph’s main points/ideas in a bullet-proof view.Begin by placing…

Read more

THREE common nutrition myths – busted!

There is a constant influx of incorrect nutrition advice being thrown around the internet, so I thought it would be great to bust three of the top myths that pop up in my news feed. MYTH #1: The MSG in Chinese food is toxic MSG is short for monosodium glutamate. It is a common food additive used to enhance food flavour. It is derived from the amino acid ‘glutamate’ which is a neurotransmitter. There is a myth that eating Chinese food that contains MSG leads to excessive glutamate in the brain and excessive stimulation of nerve cells. However, research has shown that dietary glutamate should have little to no effect on your brain, as it cannot cross the blood-brain barrier in large amounts.1Overall, there is no compelling evidence that MSG…

Read more
THREE common nutrition myths – busted!
Should we advise patients to eat a diet based on their DNA?

Should we advise patients to eat a diet based on their DNA?

What is nutritional genomics? How can we predict which diets will work for which patients? Nutritional genomics may be able to help in the future. Nutritional genomics is the science that looks at the relationship between our genes, nutrition and health. The techniques of this science can help categorise optimal nutrition for various groups and individuals. This may be useful in promoting the development of food treatments and functionally enhanced foods that will help achieve optimal health. Should I tell my patients to follow a DNA-diet? While this is definitely an exciting time for nutrition science, we cannot yet look at someone’s genes and advise of an exact diet. There is definitely a growing body of evidence regarding gene-nutrient interactions, however less is known about how we translate this research into…

Read more

Tips on how to disseminate your research findings effectively

As researchers, we know that effective dissemination of research findings is extremely important to help bridge the gap between research and policy. I have supervised many PhD students in my career and often find they are confused about where to begin when it comes to research dissemination. Here are some clear steps to take that anyone can follow:   STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT Identify the stakeholders who might be interested in your research. Ask yourself these questions: Who might be interested in, benefit from, or be impacted by my research? Why would my research be of interest to these people? What aspects of my research are most relevant to these people (which parts of my research align with their goals)? How do each of these people interact with others (what degree of…

Read more
Tips on how to disseminate your research findings effectively
Academic Burnout – How do you switch off?

Academic Burnout – How do you switch off?

As a researcher, academic or PhD student, it can be difficult to completely disconnect with your work without feeling guilty about it. Rest is extremely important for productivity and mental health. The question of how to “switch off” from work was posed in our online journal club this week (please let me know if you would like to join us!). I thought this would be a great space to share the tips and tricks that were discussed among fellow researchers and PhD students from a variety of disciplines: 1. Have a switch off time during the working week (eg. 6pm) where you cease to check/respond to emails and undertake any work. Promise yourself one FULL day off on the weekend (no emails and no reading or writing for work). Look…

Read more

Dietetic Consultation Can Help Manage Cardiovascular Disease

Thanks to a recent study published in the April 2019 edition of Nutrition & Dietetics: Journal of the Dieticians Association of Australia, people suffering from or who exhibit risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) can breathe easier. By using dietetic consultation in addition to their regular treatment regimen in their primary-care setting, high-risk CVD patients can lower their blood lipids and reduce the risk factors that often come with the disease.   Dietary behavior change is where it all starts CVD has long thought to be a preventable and manageable condition, especially when dietary behaviour change is added to a patient’s regular treatment plan. The study includes evidence-based consultations with patients that consisted of face-to-face education designed specifically for the patient in question and counselling designed to help change their…

Read more
Dietetic Consultation Can Help Manage Cardiovascular Disease
KTAustralia Celebrates 5 Years With New Name

KTAustralia Celebrates 5 Years With New Name

When Tamika Heiden (Twitter handle @KTAustralia) left academia five years ago to start KTAustralia (Knowledge Translation Australia), her goal was to provide academics with the support they needed to frame their academic research in terms of translation or impact. Research impact in Australia is a hot button topic and one that is near and dear to Tamika’s heart. This year, KT Australia celebrates their fifth year of helping academics with a new name that aligns better with the sector she serves. Let’s give Tamika and the Research Impact Academy a big hand!   What Is Research Impact?   To understand what Tamika and Research Impact Academy does, you first need to understand what research impact means. Gone are the days when researchers required funding to gain knowledge for knowledge sake.…

Read more

Food Policy Win for Queensland

Unless you’ve been hiding under a rock or vacationing in the Outback, you may have heard about the significant food policy win that took place in Queensland last week. Over the long Easter weekend, media throughout the country announced the newly approved policy banning the advertisement of unhealthy foods, drinks, and alcohol on Government-owned advertising spaces. With the exception of major stadiums in Queensland, this new policy will affect over 2000 advertising spaces throughout the state. This means the rail network, busways, bus shelters, roadsides and advertising space outside major hospitals will no longer be allowed to advertise unhealthy food and drink choices. This is the perfect opportunity to start promoting healthier lifestyle choices. The policy will come into effect as advertising contracts and leases start to cup up for…

Read more
Food Policy Win for Queensland
Opportunities for GPs to learn about nutrition are increasing!

Opportunities for GPs to learn about nutrition are increasing!

Opportunities for GPs to learn about nutrition are increasing! I have recently been fortunate enough to be involved in the development of one of Australia’s first dedicated CPD (continuing professional development) opportunities for nutrition. Click Here to view the full article. We have outlined below the major factors involved and we want to hear from you if you are of the same belief. Below are 3 main reasons to take this study into consideration I feel fortunate that most of the content is aimed at addressing the gap our team has identified that GPs have insufficient knowledge, skills and attitudes towards nutrition. Some dietitians actually discourage other health professionals to learn about nutrition.  They want to be the only ones who are seen to have expertise, which is not patient-centred.…

Read more

Do your PhD on the History of Nutrition in Medicine

Do your PhD on the History of Nutrition in Medicine.  We are actively seeking candidates who are eager and willing to do their PhD on the history of nutrition in medicine.  This is a  unique opportunity and one that requires full commitment, resources and dedication. You will not only possess the knowledge to demonstrate this theory but also the passion to ensure that the medical profession continues to rely on the fundamentals of nutrition and how they impact our health and our wellbeing now and in the future. A SCHOLARSHIP is now available for the right candidate with equivalent Class 1 Honours to assist us unpack the history of nutrition in medicine in Australia. To be eligible for consideration, the task requires the submission of a blog article which covers…

Read more
Do your PhD on the History of Nutrition in Medicine
The Dos and Don’ts of Influencing Policy

The Dos and Don’ts of Influencing Policy

Dr. Lauren Ball is the  Executive Member of the Australasian Association for Academic Primary Care and in this week’s newsletter, the following reading recommendation was provided. CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE FULL ARTICLE This high level article talks about influencing policy through research, which is something we all strive to achieve. The recommendations seem quite basic, but we seem to have been presented with somewhat of a conundrum. After recently being involved in providing advice to the Queensland Government roadmap for reducing obesity,  the advice was commissioned through a third party and did not involve any real-time discussion with named people in government, nor did they know my name, only my label as an expert academic in the field.  This raises the question of how academics can better communicate with…

Read more

Should Dietitians be benchmarked?

Should dietitians be benchmarked? We recently asked dietitians if they would feel comfortable in sharing de-identified patient data to support national data collection on the effectiveness of dietitians. It was published across two articles: and these can be viewed in their entirety in the links below. Click Here to view Article One Click Here to view Article Two I was shocked  (maybe I shouldn’t have been) that dietitians were extremely worried about the prospect of sharing data outside of their own practice. Not because of ethics or data governance or security issues, but because they were worried that they would appear to be ineffective compared to others. Ironically, nearly all the dietitians we interviewed had this same view, suggesting that dietitians may lack confidence in their own efficacy to provide dietetic…

Read more
Should Dietitians be benchmarked?